If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced. - Vincent Van Gogh

helpfulharrie:

Source: len-yan

Anonymous SAID:
What are the signs of emotional abuse?

mental-health-advice:

mental-health-advice:

Abusive Expectations - Makes impossible demands, requires constant attention, and constantly criticizes.

Aggressing - Name calling, accusing, blames, threatens or gives orders, and often disguised as a judgmental “I know best” or “helping” attitude.

Constant Chaos - Deliberately starts arguments with you or others. May treat you well in front of others, but changes when you’re alone.

Rejecting - Refusing to acknowledge a person’s value, worth or presence. Communicating that he or she is useless or inferior or devaluing his or her thoughts and feelings.

Denying - Denies personal needs (especially when need is greatest) with the intent of causing hurt or as punishment. Uses silent treatment as punishment. Denies certain events happened or things that were said. Denies your perceptions, memory and sanity by disallowing any viewpoints other than their own which causes self-doubt, confusion, and loss of self-esteem.

Degrading - Any behavior that diminishes the identity, worth or dignity of the person such as: name-calling, mocking, teasing, insulting, ridiculing,

Emotional Blackmail - Uses guilt, compassion, or fear to get what he or she wants.

Terrorizing - Inducing intense fear or terror in a person, by threats or coercion.

Invalidation - Attempts to distort your perception of the world by refusing to acknowledge your personal reality. Says that your emotions and perceptions aren’t real and shouldn’t be trusted.

Isolating - Reducing or restricting freedom and normal contact with others.

Corrupting - Convincing a person to accept and engage in illegal activities.

Exploiting - Using a person for advantage or profit.

Minimizing - A less extreme form of denial that trivializes something you’ve expressed as unimportant or inconsequential.

Unpredictable Responses - Gets angry and upset in a situation that would normally not warrant a response. You walk around on eggshells to avoid any unnecessary drama over innocent comments you make. Drastic mood swings and outbursts.

Gaslighting -A form of psychological abuse involving the manipulation of situations or events that cause a person to be confused or to doubt his perceptions and memories. Gaslighting causes victims to constantly second-guess themselves and wonder if they’re losing their minds.

Love, Salem

Holy jeez this has a lot of notes. Super good info

eyecaging:

Build a Custom Panel for Adobe Photoshop by Long Pham

"I go over the creation of a simple brush selector for PS

Related resources :

Adobe Configurator
http://labs.adobe.com/downloads/configurator.html

John’s painting companion
http://drbjrart.deviantart.com/art/drbjr-Digital-Painting-Companion-PS-CS6-CC-FREE-462681191

Level up! youtube channel
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOzPkdDPBOrEKyUrRSCZv0A

Shaddy Safadi
http://www.shaddyconceptart.com/

Kiwi Juice for affordable learning material
http://www.kiwijuice.net/

Writing Side Characters: Thoughts

fuckyourwritinghabits:

Hey Writing Habits, do you have any tips or links for writing side characters? Keeping the little guys as interesting as the big ones, as it were?

Your side characters have their own backgrounds. Fleshing those out will help you a lot in figuring out what they can do and when. Even if you end up with thirty pages of notes that will never see the light of day - or more! - getting to know them will help you a lot in making them interesting.

Your side characters are not aware they are side characters. Everybody else is starring in their story. They’re not going to drop everything just to be there in time to provide a key plot point or helpful hint. They have to behave naturally, and within their own interests.

What we don’t know can be just as interesting as what we do. Having some mysteries remain about your side characters can make them just as memorable as the main ones. Why didn’t Shelly cry at her mom’s funeral? Why was the secretary willing to risk her job to help the detective? Hinting at their motives - or leaving characters wondering at them - can help make them more real.

That said, giving them motives is super important. Shortcuts and stock characters leave much to be desired. As a writer, you can do better than that. The girl who gets with the guy at the end is just that, a stock character. The girl who gets with the guy at the end because they really like each other or because of Some Other Reason just got more interesting.

Hope these help!

The Effects of Alcohol and Alcoholism Withdrawal

midnightreference:

Short-Term Effects of Alcohol

  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness
  • Vomiting
  • Upset stomach
  • Headaches
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Impaired judgment
  • Distorted vision and hearing
  • Blackouts
  • Flushed appearance
  • Intense moods
  • Lack of coordination and slower reflexes
  • Reduced concentration

Long-Term Effects of Alcohol

  • High blood pressure
  • Stroke
  • Liver disease
  • Brain damage
  • Vitamin B1 deficiency
  • Ulcers
  • Mouth/throat cancer
  • Malnutrition
  • Concentration & memory problems

Withdrawal Symptoms

  • Within 2-6 hours of the last drink
    • Insomnia
    • Anxiety
    • Headache
    • Reduced appetite
    • Tremors
    • Stomachache
    • Paleness
    • Clammy skin
    • Rapid heart rate
    • Dilated pupils
    • Fatigue
    • Irritability
    • Depression
    • Rapid emotional changes
  • Within 12-24 hours
    • Some experience alcoholic hallucinosis, which includes visual, auditory, and tactile hallucinations that normally end within 48 hours
    • Most are aware that the hallucinations aren’t real
  • Within 24-48 hours
    • Withdrawal seizures may occur
    • Risk is increased after multiple detoxifications
  • Within 48-72 hours
    • DTs (delirium tremens) may occur
    • DTs usually peak at 5 days
    • Disorientation
    • Confusion
    • Anxiety
    • Seizures
    • High blood pressure
    • Severe tremors
    • Fever
    • Irregular heartbeat
    • Sweating
    • Hallucinations indistinguishable from reality

Sources:

http://alcoholism.about.com/cs/withdraw/a/aa030307a.htm

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=5&cad=rja&sqi=2&ved=0CHIQFjAE&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.unmc.edu%2Ffamilymed%2Fdocs%2FAlcohol_Withdrawal.ppt&ei=qaZ6UvDyGsrPsASbgYFg&usg=AFQjCNFvG9Oy1kEM14tOtqBqlqFTd18TbQ&sig2=F28HRYeGeq8j5K01n0eOpw&bvm=bv.55980276,d.cWc

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/alcohol-abuse/alcohol-withdrawal-symptoms-treatments?page=1

http://www.dassa.sa.gov.au/site/page.cfm?u=122

http://www.drinkwise.org.au/you-alcohol/alcohol-facts/short-term-harm/

http://www.drugfreeworld.org/drugfacts/alcohol/short-term-long-term-effects.html

Story Elements: This is Why We Fight

writing-questions-answered:

milkovichhelps:

Below the cut you’ll find a masterlist of links to resources specializing in combat. The masterlist covers topics such as the military, hand to hand combat, injuries, firearms, and various other weapons. If you have anything you’d like to add to the masterlist then feel free to send me a message.

Read More

Anonymous SAID:
Hi! I want to create some fictional (perhaps even fantasy-esque) drugs, but I don't even know where to start. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

clevergirlhelps:

Firstly, the drugs need to do something good that “hooks” people. No one’s going to keep taking a drug that sends them to the twelfth plane of torment or one that makes them totally colorblind. You can sort most drug effects into four categories:

  • Happy (MDMA, heroin). The user experiences extreme euphoria and contentment. This may be accompanied by feelings of kinship with those around them and diminished anxiety. Users may achieve a transcendental state. It may also reduce inhibitions.
  • High (cocaine, alcohol). Users experience a burst of energy, confidence, and feelings of sexual prowess. Inhibitions are reduced. Users sometimes become more aggressive.
  • Mellow (marijuana). User feels calm and relaxed. Everything feels “taken care of”. Again, may induce transcendental state. The user will also experience mild euphoria and anxiety will diminish.
  • Trippy (LSD, shrooms). Significant alteration of sensory perception. People may see halos around objects or believe solid surfaces are wobbling. Shrooms reportedly increase one’s sensitivity to sound. Time loses meaning. Users lose sense of self.

Theoretically, you could make fantasy drugs for any desirable human emotion, like the feeling of being full, orgasm, confidence, love, and satisfaction.

Secondly, where does the drug come from?

  • Natural. Like shrooms, opium, or cannabis, it must be grown and harvested. Who farms it? Is it illegal to farm? What kind of plant is it? Where does it grow best? 
  • Manufactured. Like MDMA and LSD, it’s made in a lab. Who makes it? What ingredients is it made of? Does an organization control its manufacture?
  • Magic. The drug is actually a spell and someone has to cast it on you.

Related is how the drug gets from the lab/farm to you. Who controls the trade? How far away is it? All of this will affect the price.

Thirdly, how do you take it?

  • Inhaling. Includes methods like smoking, where the drug is rolled into a thin cylinder and placed between the lips; you inhale to feel the effects. Also included are practices like huffing, where you inhale noxious chemicals from a container.
  • Drinking. Self-explanatory. You can also anally imbibe drinks to hasten the effects.
  • Injecting. Put it in a needle and stick it in a blood vessel. The drug goes right into the blood stream.
  • Swallowing. The drug comes in a pill, like ecstasy. You swallow it and digesting it will give you the full effects. You could also eat it, like most psychedelic mushrooms. 
  • Absorbing. The body has several areas where blood vessels lie close to the surface of the skin. Applying the drug to the area will allow it to diffuse into the bloodstream. These areas are: the nose (snorting), the mouth (chewing/dipping tobacco), and the rectum (anally imbibing alcohol). 

Fourthly, what are the side effects? There will be side effects unless your magic or technology is advanced to the point at which you can reverse severe neurological damage. 

  • Mild. Reddened eyes, headache, dehydration, dry mouth, nausea, sweating, hunger, loss of appetite
  • Moderate. Memory loss, insomnia, diarrhea, vertigo, suggestibility, vomiting, hearing loss
  • Severe. Necrosis, muscle rigidity, convulsions, bad trips, physical disfigurement (eg “meth mouth”), psychosis, HPPD
  • Chronic. Depression, suicidal thoughts, anxiety, dependence on the drug, irritability, fatigue, rage
  • Way down the road. Cancer, emphysema, COPD, heart problems, lung problems, liver problems, kidney problems, Parkinson’s, stroke, high blood pressure

If your drug is fantastical, then it has more variety as to the side effects. For example, it turns green-eyed people into rabbits, slowly turns one’s stomach to stone, causes users to go back in time, and has a 2% chance of exploding your head.

Fifthly, how does the culture view it?

  • Illegal. No one can use it for any reason. In which case, the drugs will be controlled by an illegal group like a gang or cartel. There will be harsh laws against its manufacture and spread. People who don’t take the drug will look down on people who do.
  • Illegal with exceptions. It’s been shown to aid things like concentration or alleviate the symptoms of that disease. People who can use this drug must obtain it from special makers and carry permission with them at all times.
  • Legal with exceptions. Like alcohol and tobacco in the US, you can buy it and use it in most areas. However, you can’t buy it if you’re under a certain age, can’t use it in buildings, and you can get in trouble if you use it at the wrong time (drinking and driving).
  • Legal. Everyone can use it. There are no restricts on when, where, how, or who.
  • Spiritual. The drug is used as part if a religious experience. Only those undergoing such an experience can take it. The drug is a gateway to another world, frees the conscience, or some other esoteric thing.

Finally, how does that affect society? You should consider,

  • How much it costs. Illegality and the amount of time/money it takes to manufacture will affect pricing. It may also vary by the time of year. For example, if it’s natural, then maybe the drug is cheapest immediately after the harvesting season and really expensive during the winter, when it’s impossible to grow. You also need to factor in how people will get the money to buy the drug, such as stealing or prostitution.
  • Support groups. People will get hooked. How can they get off? Family and friends will certainly try their best, as most drugs do not improve your working or home life. Are they the only methods of support or are there rehab organizations as well?
  • Laws and their enforcement. (Don’t look at this is if your drug is totally legal or legal with exceptions.) There will be laws against its use. How are they enforced? Do the laws go after distributers as well as consumers? How are the consumers treated in court - as criminals or as victims? 
  • Who takes it. In our world, most illegal drug users are lower-income. It’s “shocking” when someone of the middle or upper class is addicted to drugs. The lower-class reputation has led to other classes looking down on drug users as poor, filthy, and needy; and on the lower-class as drug-addicted degenerates. If the upper class took it, then perhaps taking the drug would be the cool thing to do and being high/stoned/buzzed would be a status symbol. Only peasants have lucid thoughts; true nobles don’t know what they’re doing 90% of the time. 
  • Media. The US government banned smoking ads featuring Camel Cigarettes’ mascot, Joe the Camel, in 1997 because he appealed to children and people don’t like their kids lighting up. You don’t see too many cigarette ads in the US anymore. On the other hand, the media glorifies alcohol. Drinking makes you a man. Drinking makes you sexy. Many can’t wait (or don’t wait) to turn 21 and engage in this manly, sexy world of alcohol. So please, please remember that how the drug is presented will affect who consumes it.

jsmney:

my eyeballed sketchy kind of systematic study from a watts handout heh

steampunkxlove:

thewritingcafe:

Guide to Writing Steampunk

BASICS

Punk Genres: most common genres are in italics

  • Atompunk: Optimistic retro science fiction based on the Space Age. Think The Jetsons.
  • BiopunkThis genre is about altering genetics and DNA. These stories often take place in the near-future in which humans have been altered or in which human experimentation is common.
  • Candlepunk: Similar to clockpunk, but darker and with less technology.
  • ClockpunkThink Da Vinci’s inventions, but more advanced while. This genre follows the aesthetics and technology of Western civilization during the mid to late middle ages, though sometimes it’s set in the Victorian era.
  • Cyberpunk: Has advanced technology and often focuses on artificial intelligence and the cyber world. The setting is often near-future rather than far-future. Blade Runner is an example.
  • Dieselpunk: Based on aesthetics and technology between World War I and World War II, sometimes up until the Cold War.
  • Decopunk: Ranges from the aesthetics of the 1920’s to the 1950’s. Decopunk aesthetic is heavily based on modernism. Less gritty than dieselpunk.
  • Elfpunk: Basically urban fantasy, but with common high or epic fantasy creatures put in an urban setting rather than vampires and werewolves.
  • Nanopunk: Similar to biopunk, but biotechnology is less available and nanotechnology is common.
  • Sandalpunk: Set in ancient worlds, such as Rome, but with advanced technology.
  • Splatterpunk: Extremely graphic and contains a lot of gore.
  • Steampunk: This genre gets its name from the heavy steam-powered technology involved. Aesthetics are based on the Victorian and industrial eras of the Western world, though other cultural elements may be used.
  • Western Steampunk: Similar to steampunk, but with Western (as in Wild West) aesthetics and settings.
So why are there so many sub genres? For starters, they help agents and publishers get an idea of what they’re in for if you’re going through the traditional publishing route. While bookstores usually just put these genres within science fiction or fantasy, you can still market your book through sub genres to reach a specific group of people who are looking for these genres.
 
However, there are a lot of sub genres, most of which many have not heard of. If you’ve written one of these genres and intend to publish it, the best would be to put it under another name (with the exception of steampunk, cyberpunk, and biopunk). For example, if you have written a candlepunk story, you can propose it as fantasy, alternate historical fiction, or any other genre it may fit in. While atomicpunk is quite common, it’s not well known by that name. If you have written an atompunk story, the best way to market it would be to call it retro science fiction.
 
But what’s the difference between punk genres and historical fiction? The technology is a big difference. It’s usually more advanced for the time it’s modeled after.
 
TECHNOLOGY
The technology is one of the defining aspects of steampunk. It’s the basis for the world you’re writing in. For the typical steampunk story, technology will be (of course) steam powered.
 
CHARACTERS & FASHION
Another defining feature of steampunk is the aesthetics and the characters. Steampunk takes the latter part of the word (punk) to mean the opposition of the mainstream, though that’s not always necessary in your story.
Research jobs common in the Victorian age and add steam to it. Your characters will revolve around their setting and their clothing may be a part of that too.
READING

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CYBERPUNK

HEY LOOK ANON. :3

CLARAOSMIN